5 Ways to Deal with Stress and Anxiety at a New Job

stress.jpgAuthor: Riya Sand
Source: TopResume

A new job is exciting … and potentially stressful.

Stress is a debilitating threat for millions of people across the globe. While physicians, colleagues, and family alike may coax you to limit the stressors in your life, such advice may seem like a meaningless platitude when faced with the reality of a new job.

When you’re exiting an old job and entering a new company, you’ll be faced with a barrage of problems that can seem daunting. These anxieties are even more extreme when you’re entering the workforce fresh from college. Excitement about a new career can quickly transform into panic, so below are a few tips on how to tackle work-related stress and beat anxiety.

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How to Handle an Interview if You Have Multiple Job Offers

Two_Job_OffersAuthor: Madeline Mann
Source: The Ladders

What do I do if I have job offers but still have other interviews? Receiving a job offer while you are still in the interview process elsewhere can put you at a huge advantage if you play your cards right. Here is exactly what you should say to each company involved to maintain great relationships and set you up to potentially get multiple offers.

To simplify the explanation, I will call the company that gave you an offer “Company A,” and the company that you are still in the interview process with, “Company B.”

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How to Write a Self-Review

self-reviewAuthor: Alyse Kalish
Source: The Muse

Ah, performance review season! Hopefully you’re hopping into this stretch with a confident step. But, if you’re not that’s normal, too—you’ll probably want to read this and this to get your nerves under control.

Odds are that you’re reading this because you’ve been asked to write a self-review before your formal one. Or, if not that, your boss is sending vague requests like, “Plan on discussing your progress this year. Bring a few examples on paper.”

This can be intimidating—maybe you’re not sure what to talk about, or maybe you’re a horrible writer and can’t imagine churning out complete sentences about yourself, or maybe you’re unsure of how honest you should really be.

Don’t stress—here’s everything you need to know.

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5 Painful But Important Things To Do When You Lose Your Job

lostjobAuthor: Elizabeth Alterman
Source: The Muse

When I lost my job in 2014, I naturally slipped into a self-pity funk for a bit.

What did I do first? I promptly made an enormous bowl of tiramisu and attempted to soothe my bruised ego with dessert. But—as good as it feels to take a well-deserved time-out—the quicker you curtail the wallowing and get back to the grind, the better for your career.

After realizing I wasn’t going to find a new job at the bottom of my trifle bowl, I put my spoon in the sink and got right down to business. I found a new job six months later, but was again laid off in 2017 amid a restructuring. This time, I was much better prepared to re-enter the job market.

The following is a painful but crucial to-do list anyone who’s been laid off should follow, based on my experience:

1. Acknowledge Your Emotions, Then Move On

Immediately after you’ve been let go, you may find yourself experiencing a range of emotions: panic upon saying goodbye to a regular paycheck, exhilaration as you embrace life without a set routine, rage when you reflect on all the long hours you devoted to your former position—the list goes on.

Rather than get caught up in each of these, recognize that they’re all normal.

But then—and this is the tough love talk everyone needs in this situation—move on and focus on the future.

In the case of both my layoffs, multiple colleagues were let go at the same time. Proving the old adage “misery loves company,” we served as our own little support group, commiserating together, motivating each other, and sharing leads.

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If you find yourself alone and struggling, joining a group or talking to a professional can provide comfort and encouragement and help you reign in those negative emotions.

Related: How to Bounce Back After You Lose Your Job (and Feel Like the World’s Ending)

2. Tell Everyone (Yes, Even Strangers)

Chances are, your self-esteem has taken a hit, and saying “I’m unemployed” aloud makes it that much more real and devastating.

Though you may be tempted to keep your status a secret, friends and family can’t begin to help if they’re not aware. Letting people know you’re available for new opportunities is the first step in getting your job search off the ground. (This email template will make it easier).

Right after losing my job in 2014, I attended a friend’s party and upon meeting her pals, I was asked the dreaded, “So, what do you do?” I reluctantly told people about my layoff and waited to be flooded with boatloads of pity.

But what I got instead was actually solid support. From headhunter contact information to offers to share my resume with their HR departments, people I’d just met were more than willing to help. I left the party glad I’d spilled the beans, no matter how awkward I’d initially felt.

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Pro tip: When talking about it, focus on what you want to do next—rather than what happened. For example, “I recently lost my job at [Company] and what I’ve missed most is working with customers. So, in my next job, I’m looking for a customer-facing role at a mid-sized company” sounds a lot better than, “I was laid-off because my CEO doesn’t know how to budget and goodness knows how I’ll pay rent this month. Honestly, at this point, I’d take anything that doesn’t suck.”

Related: 4 Questions to Ask Your Network Besides, “Can You Get Me a Job?”

3. Get Your Finances in Check and Create a Budget

Talking money is awkward, but knowledge is power. Figure out exactly what you’ve got to work with so you’re not accumulating debt at a time when you can least afford it.

The difference between the paycheck you lost and what you receive from severance or unemployment will determine if you need to make some adjustments to your spending—and just how sizable those should be. And this budget worksheet can help you get organized.

When I was forced to stop and really look at my finances, I realized I had to make some changes. I started with a bunch of small cuts: dinners in, books borrowed from the library, yoga at home instead of at a nearby studio. Doing this not only made me feel like I was preventing a bad situation from getting worse, it also motivated me to find a new job—fast.

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3 Things You Should Always Do in the First Month of a New Job

new_jobAuthor: Sarah Goff
Source: Idealist Careers

Starting a new job can elicit a range of emotions: excitement, anxiety, hope. But regardless of how you’re feeling leading up to your first day, you want to be sure that you launch your new career with a plan in mind for how you’ll make an impact and a great first impression.

If you’d like to map out your first days and weeks at a new job, but you’re not quite sure where to begin, here are our three must-dos:

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What to Realistically Do if Nobody is Listening to You at Work

listentomeAuthor: Kat Boogaard
Source: The Muse

You’re in a team meeting, hashing out how to resolve an issue that everybody has been repeatedly battling with.

“What if we changed the process so that the sales team saw the report first?” you suggest, “That way the design team could step in with all of the information there—without having to re-format graphics later.”

Perhaps a few somewhat courteous colleagues mutter a “maybe” or a nonchalant “that could work,” but then the conversation quickly moves on to something different. You’re annoyed, but you decide to let it go for now.

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Want More Time? Do a Time Audit!

timeAuthor: Nisha Kumar Kulkarni
Source: Idealist Careers

Though we all do our best to maximize our time, occasionally, we find ourselves wishing for more hours in the day in order to be more productive at work and at home. And while there’s no shortage of apps and software available to help you boost productivity, you may want to consider another solution: The time audit.

Read on to learn the ins and outs of conducting your own time audit and what to do with your findings.

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