The 4 Step Method to Managing Your Anxiety at Work

anxietyAuthor: Nisha Kumar Kulkarni
Source: Idealist Careers

A 2009 New Zealand study found that one in seven women and one in 10 men in high-pressure jobs reported clinical levels of anxiety though they had no mental health history to speak of.

This may resonate deeply with those engaged in mission-driven work, where balancing workplace demands with self-care can feel like a tightrope act.

This piece will explore a four-step method for what you can do if and when you suffer from panic or anxiety in the workplace brought on by self-talk, self-doubt, or insecurity. If, however, you feel your anxiety is disrupting your daily life, there’s no shame in seeking help. Resources like the NAMI HelpLine can be a great resource for finding affordable mental healthcare near you.

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How to Know if You’re Ready to Be a Manager

managerAuthor: Kat Boogaard
Source: The Muse

You’re interested in stepping up into a management role with your current company, but there’s just one question that keeps nagging at you: Are you ready?

Sure, you’ve produced consistently great results in your existing position and have forged some solid bonds with many of your colleagues. You’re proud of that—but, you’re also unsure of whether or not that truly means you’re cut out for a step up the proverbial ladder.

Fortunately, there are a few other telltale signs you can keep your eye out for that will help you figure out whether or not you’re actually management material.

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Technology Tuesday: June 5th

Osseointegration

Welcome to Technology Tuesday! Every week The Job Shop Blog will bring you our 5 top science and technology news stories from around the web.

This week: Bulletproof batteries, artificial limbs you forget are there, the FDA approves Golden Rice, smart roads, and 3D printed corneas. Continue reading

Technology Tuesday: May 29th

mars

Welcome to Technology Tuesday! Every week The Job Shop Blog will bring you our 5 top science and technology news stories from around the web.

This week: Robot nerves, changing our DNA to have children on Mars, taking a look at what Mars habitats might look like, the world’s largest “virtual” power plant, and preventing food poisoning with a smart phone. Continue reading

Weekend Planner: May 25th

WeekendPlanner

You’ve worked hard all week, and now Friday’s here again! It’s time to start planning your weekend!  Welcome to Weekend Planner, your weekend update on fun.

Every Friday we put together a list of the weekend events we think look most interesting and provide them here. Keep in mind there is always a lot more going on, and all it takes is a little digging to find something that will be the perfect activity for you.

Click on any of the event titles for a link to the event.

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The Best Career Advice from This Year’s Commencement Speeches

commencement_speechAuthor: Jenna McGregor
Source: Washington Post

This year’s headline-grabbing commencement speeches have been high on thinly veiled critiques of the Trump administration and big on dire warnings about the state of American democracy.

Former secretary of state Rex Tillerson cautioned graduates at Virginia Military Institute about the end of American democracy if Americans don’t “confront the crisis of ethics and integrity in our society and among our leaders.” Michael Bloomberg talked at Rice University of the threat from “our own willingness to tolerate dishonesty in service of party and in pursuit of power.” And 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, raising a Russian ushanka hat as part of a Yale University tradition, said Sunday that “we’re living through a full-fledged crisis in our democracy,” telling students “to stay vigilant, to neither close our eyes, nor numb our hearts or throw up our hands.”

But not all of this year’s graduation speeches are quite so political or cautionary. A few — though not many — seemed to remember that they were speaking before a group of people who were about to embark upon life as adults who will have to navigate the politics of the workplace, the complexities of new relationships and the decisions of adult life. (Oprah Winfrey to USC Annenberg School for Communications and Journalism graduates: “Invest in a quality mattress. Your back will thank you later.”)

Here, some of the best advice offered by this year’s commencement speakers so far that graduates — or anyone — can apply to their work and careers:

Oprah Winfrey, chair and CEO of OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network, Annenberg School for Communications and Journalism at the University of Southern California

Winfrey, whose past speeches have drawn speculation that she might be planning a run for president — a rumor she has squashed — got plenty of attention for her calls for graduates to vote in her speech at USC on May 11. But after offering a litany of practical wisdom (“Eat a good breakfast,” she said. “Pay your bills on time. Recycle.”) she also added some clear advice for graduates’ time in the workplace.

“The number one lesson I can offer you where your work is concerned,” said the media titan, “is this: Become so skilled, so vigilant, so flat-out fantastic at what you do, that your talent cannot be dismissed.”

She also countered the typical “do what you love” advice that fill so many graduation speeches with something else. “You need to know this: Your job is not always going to fulfill you,” she said. “There will be some days that you just might be bored. Other days you may not feel like going to work at all. Go anyway, and remember that your job is not who you are. It’s just what you are doing on the way to who you will become. With every remedial chore, every boss who takes credit for your ideas — that is going to happen — look for the lessons, because the lessons are always there.”

Hamdi Ulukaya, CEO of Chobani

The founder of the popular Greek-yogurt business, which has been caught in partisan sparring over Ulukaya’s history of hiring refugees, spoke at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School about the growing societal expectation that CEOs speak up on social issues.

“We are entering a new era, when the center of gravity for social change has moved to the private sector,” he said on May 13. “It’s business, not government, that is in the best position to lead today. It’s not government hiring refugees, it’s business. It’s not government cutting emissions, it’s business. It’s not government standing up to gun violence, it’s business.”

But he also had some advice for the business school grads.

“It’s great that you are a Wharton MBA. But please, don’t act like it,” he said.

That advice came from his employees, he said, after he asked them what he should say in his speech. What they meant was not to treat people like the stereotype of the heartless, number-crunching business school grad.

“Don’t let it get in the way of seeing people as people and all they have to offer you, regardless of their title or position,” he said. “Acknowledging the wisdom and experience of a forklift operator or security guard with 30 years on the job doesn’t diminish your own experience. Acknowledging the sacrifice of others that enabled you to be in this position does not diminish the sacrifices you made on your own.”

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5 Steps to Productive Self Awareness

180522_KnowThyself_800x400Author: Laura Stack
Source: The Productivity Pro

In recent years, the concept of emotional intelligence has gained traction in the business world. Most of us know brilliant people who seem hopeless when it comes to dealing with people; either they try to dominate everyone, or they fade into the shadows and let others handle the purely human aspects of work. Most of us express one of these tendencies to some extent, but the standouts take them to extremes.

Those who interact well with others have a high “EQ,” or “emotional intelligence quotient” based on self-awareness. They may or may not also have high IQs, but they’re generally comfortable in their own skins, because they’ve taken seriously the Biblical directive to “know thyself.” As a result, they have a higher level of social functionality than many of their colleagues, particularly in the psychological and emotional realms.

Use these five self-analysis techniques to boost your self-awareness:

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