5 Awkward Situations When You’re New at Work

awkwardAuthor: Abby Wolfe
Source: The Daily Muse

On day one of my first “real” job, I had no idea what to do with myself. Around 3:30 PM, I turned to a co-worker and asked, “So, uh, what time do you usually leave each day?”

When offered the job three weeks earlier, the hiring manager told me my hours were “up to me and my supervisor.” Well, that conversation never happened, so I had no idea when I could go home.

Starting a new gig can be really overwhelming—whether it’s your first one or your 10th. There are loads of unspoken rules you haven’t learned yet, and you have to get to know a whole new group of people.

But, as time goes on, there are certain situations that’ll become second nature. (Or at least feel a little bit easier.)

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10 Tips For Getting The Raise You Deserve

raiseAuthor: Stacey Lastoe
Source: The Daily Muse

You know it’s time. You’ve been anticipating this conversation for weeks now. The meeting’s on the calendar, and there’s no backing out now—not that you’d want to. No, you want this raise. You deserve this. You’re ready for this.

Deep breath. Your boss isn’t going to bite. Or will she?

Not if you’re as prepared as possible, as confident as can be, and as accomplished in your role as anyone deserving of a raise ought to be.

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A Resume Template That Actually Lands You Interviews

doggyworkAuthor: Joanna Taborda
Source: The Muse

My first resume was just a half-page long and the only feedback I received was that I should’ve included more work experience. When I got home, I immediately did a Google search because I (admittedly) didn’t know what I was doing.

I went the other way for my next attempt and wrote my life story. It didn’t get me a single reply. I hated that feeling and decided to experiment until I found a resume that would give me results.

So, I started designing different templates. I tried various fonts, added images, and played with all sorts of colors and effects, until I created something I felt really proud of. As an arts major with design experience, I wanted to show off my particular skill set.

I sent out the revamped version, and the very same day I got a call for an interview. Fast-forward one month and I was working at a Ritz-Carlton resort. The first thing my manager said was “We don’t often get resumes like this in the hospitality industry, so I was eager to meet you.”

I’ve used this template with every application since. While I’m still relatively early in my career and I’ve shifted from hospitality to content editing, my resume has helped me get my foot in the door each time. I know that because I always get positive comments about it during interviews.

While I can’t guarantee that you’ll have the same results as me—this formatting might not be appropriate for every industry and role—I can share what I learned when I transformed mine from monotonous to eye-catching.

My First Resume

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My Current Resume

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1. I Settled on One Page

As I mentioned, after my too-short attempt, I overcompensated on the next round and described my life story. Seriously—I included the last play I acted in! While the latter might be pertinent when auditioning for a Broadway show, most times it’s better to leave off irrelevant information that drowns out all of your qualifications.

You should always tailor your resume to the position you’re applying for—and part of that means cutting extraneous information. It’s finding a balance between including relevant experience and removing things that distract from it.

For instance, if you want to be a content manager, you’d include any writing-related tasks you’ve had in your previous positions, plus include work on your personal blog. Doing so could mean getting rid of an earlier, unrelated position.

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4 Pre-Interview Poses to Boost Your Confidence

superman-posesAuthor: Farhan Raja
Source: Undercover Recruiter

Confidence, confidence, confidence!

It’s one of the most widely used words when it comes you job interviews and presentations. When you’re in its bubble, you’re ready to take on the world; your walk has swagger and your smile has charm, it’s a wonderful feeling! However, like any emotional state, it can change within an instant and having a lack of confidence can have a crippling effect on the rest of your mind and body.

If you don’t have confidence, you will likely struggle to express yourself clearly and your body language may give off negative and defensive vibes!

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3 Common Habits that Make You Seem Unapproachable at Work

pillboxAuthor: Nina Semezuk
Source: The Daily Muse

Imagine that you’re sitting at your desk and your co-worker, Tanya, walks by holding a sign-up sheet for the company’s kickball team. Without even pausing, she passes you and asks your neighbor if he’d like to join. Maybe you didn’t opt to participate in the softball league last season, but that doesn’t mean you’ve sworn off all organized sports forever. But, instead of piping up and asking if there’s space for you to play, you let your mind wander with worry: Maybe Tanya intentionally didn’t stop at your spot. Maybe she and others don’t want you on the team.

But, why?

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How to Deal with Depression at Work

deppressedAuthor: Betsy Aimee
Source: The Muse

A few months ago, I told you how a quarter-life crisis catapulted me into a severe depression, and my story of recovering. The response I received from that piece since tells me that I’m not alone in this plight, and that many of us have experienced a similar personal crisis. And a recent article on Forbes confirmed that more millennials are suffering from depression, anxiety, or some other form of mood disorder than ever before.

One of the hardest parts of my ordeal was that, in the midst of it all, I still had to be a functional adult and stay on top of my job responsibilities. And while there are many great books online about how to deal with depression or anxiety at work, I also want to share some suggestions based on my own experience for making it through—and even thriving.

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50 Ways to Increase Your Productivity

unproductiveAuthor: Kim Roach
Source: Lifehack

Here are 50 ways to increase your productivity and add hours to your day.

1. Take a break. You can’t always be working at optimum productivity. Instead, you should shoot for working in short bursts at your most productive times.

2. Set a timer for each of your tasks.

3. Eliminate all distractions. This includes the phone, email notifications, and having multiple web browsers open on the desktop.

4. Distractions should be avoided, but sometimes a bit of music in the background can help you focus. Of course, it doesn’t need to be heavy rock music, but a bit of Beethoven may do you some good.

5. Love what you do. Enjoying what you do is the ultimate way to increase your productivity.

6. Complete your most dreaded tasks first thing in the morning. Whichever activity you are dreading the most is probably the one you need to complete first thing in the morning.

7. Use JDarkRoom. This application allows you to write more efficiently by removing all distractions. You’re given an entirely blank page on which to type. This way, you’re not distracted by the web, e-mail, or IM. When you’re done, you can save your work as a text file.

8. Just start. Often times, starting is the hardest part. Once you get going, you will quickly get into a rhythm that could last for hours.

9. Everyone has a certain time of the day in which they are more productive than others. For me, it’s the morning. Find out when your prime time is for productivity and optimize your work schedule accordingly.

Notebook

10. Keep a notebook and pen on hand at all times. This way, you can write down your thoughts, to-dos, and ideas at any time. The key is to get everything out of your head and onto paper. This way, your subconscious mind won’t be reminding you about it every other second.

11. Write a blog to chronicle your own personal development and achievements. This keeps you accountable and always working towards self improvement and personal growth.

12. Plan out all of your meals a week ahead and make your grocery list accordingly. This will save you quite a bit of time and money.

13. Step away from the computer. The Internet has become one of the number one distractions. To increase your productivity, try to do as much of your work offline as possible. I do this a lot with my writing and have found it to be very beneficial to simply unplug.

14. Write out a to-list each day. I like to plan my day the night before. This way, I can get started on my most important tasks as soon as I wake up.

15. As you go throughout your day, repeatedly ask yourself, “Am I currently making the best possible use of my time?” This one simple question can be an excellent boost to your productivity.

16. Get plenty of sleep. When you work online, sleep can become a long lost memory. However, it’s important to get plenty of sleep so that your working hours can be as productive as possible.

17. Exercise. Research has shown that midday exercise boosts productivity and morale in the workplace. Take a short walk at lunch to maximize your productivity.

18. Organize your office. The piles of paper around your desk can be a huge barrier on your productivity. Optimize your time by organizing your office, setting up a system, and dumping the junk.

19. Outsource as much as possible. Here are just a few of the companies that will help you outsource your everyday tasks:

20. Use a Tivo or DVR to cut an hour-long television show down to just 40 minutes.


21. Turn off the TV. The average American watches more than 4 hours of television every day. Over a 65-year life, that’s 9 years glued to the tube. Turn off the TV and you are sure to get more out of life.

22. Listen to educational audio books while you’re driving to work, cleaning the house, exercising, or cooking dinner. Audio learning has the power to add hours to your day. Not to mention, your cranium is sure to thank you for it.

23. Auto pay your bills. This will save you time and eliminate late fees and increased interest rates.

24. Read David Allen’s best-selling book Getting Things Done. This is one of the most important productivity books you will ever read.

25. Focus on result-oriented activities. Pareto’s law states that 80% of the outputs result from 20% of the inputs. This means that 20% of our actions result in 80% of the results. We must find the 20% that is creating the 80% of our desired outcomes and focus solely on those activities.

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