The Power of Yet: Keeping a Growth Mindset

booksAuthor: Stav Ziv
Source: The Muse

Carol Dweck preaches “the power of yet.”

If students don’t pass a test, it’s not because they’re inherently stupid, but because they don’t understand the material well enough—yet. If employees didn’t negotiate the best deal, it doesn’t mean all future deals are doomed. It means they haven’t honed their negotiating skills enough—yet.

Dweck, a psychology professor now at Stanford University, is known for decades of work on “mindsets,” or people’s beliefs about human qualities such as intelligence and talent, both their own and others’. She developed terms you might’ve heard before: the “fixed mindset” and “growth mindset.”

“My research has shown that the view you adopt for yourself profoundly affects the way you lead your life,” Dweck writes in Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, the 2006 book that pulls together years of psychology research for the general reader. “It can determine whether you become the person you want to be and whether you accomplish the things you value.”

Well, that sounds serious. Here’s what you need to know. Well, at least the basics. Continue reading

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Why Staying Present in the Moment is So Important

presenceAuthor: Alyse Kalish
Source: The Muse

When I was in high school, my mom started banning phones from the dinner table. To this day, whenever I pull out my cell to check my inbox when we’re eating, my mom shakes her head and tells me to put it away.

And as much as I resent it in the moment (“But this, I swear, is really important!”), I’m usually grateful that she called me out.

As a working adult who’s being pulled in multiple directions at any given time, I rarely get to enjoy my time with friends and family. I’m sure you can relate. My mom, in fact, lives thousands of miles away, so when she forces me to pay attention to her it’s because we only have so much time together. And I listen to her, because I know I’ll regret not making the most of this time.

(If this isn’t the case for you and your parents, feel free to substitute “mom” with someone you enjoy being around.)

It’s so silly, but being present during our time with loved ones is one of the best gifts of self-care we can grant ourselves—and one that we tend to neglect the most often.

But don’t take it from me, I’m just your average working gal. Take it from someone who’s higher up—who has 10 times more responsibilities than I, and yet follows the same philosophy.

I spoke with Raji Arasu. In addition to being Intuit’s SVP of CTO Dev, she’s also an advisory board member for Code.org and the CTO Forum and serves on the board of directors at NIC Inc.:

One of the most important lessons I learned in my career was to drop the guilt and be present in the moment, whether it’s at work or at home. For that reason, I prioritize quality time with my family and colleagues. Being present in those delightful moments is what keeps me from reaching for my phone, and helps me to remain truly present. As a leader at Intuit, I try to set the example of making eye contact, actively listening, and participating in every interaction. I try to carry that appreciation for moments of true connection, whether at work or at home.

What I love most about Arasu’s advice is that she doesn’t just apply it to your time away from work. Practicing being present outside the office ultimately makes you better at it when you’re in the office. And this makes you a better employee (actively listening helps you better understand direction and take note of important social cues), and a more enjoyable co-worker to be around (actively paying attention makes people respect you and trust you to care for and support them).

And, like I said above, it’s good for you. It encourages you to truly unwind, take in and appreciate your breaks, and connect with people you love, all of which are crucial for anyone’s happiness. It’s almost as if it’s a form of mindfulness—crazy how that works!

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An Olympic Champion’s Guide to Facing Adversity Head On

Chloe_KIm040218-800x450Author: Meredith Lepore
Source: The Ladders

Though there were so many tremendous athletic performances to come out of the 2018 Winter Olympics, Chloe Kim was by far the one to receive the most attention after winning gold for snowboarding making her the youngest woman ever to win an Olympic snowboarding medal. From blowing up on social media — her endearing pre-gold hunger Tweet — to being mentioned in Oscar winner Frances McDormand’s acceptance speech, this girl and her career on fire.

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4 Steps to Following Your Dreams (Without Falling Flat on Your Face)

jump“When to Jump” author Mike Lewis says you should pay attention to your daydreams because they might just be nudging you toward a leap into your ideal job.

Author: Anne Fisher
Source: Monster

Two years out of an Ivy League college, 24-year-old Mike Lewis snagged a high-paying job with Bain Capital Ventures, a finance arm of prestigious consulting firm Bain & Co. He knew he should be happy. After all, only a tiny percentage of candidates for jobs like this are chosen, so getting hired at the firm, he says, was “like winning the lottery.”

Yet, an avid and skilled squash player, Lewis found himself spending more and more time “staring at the wall” in his office, daydreaming about quitting his job to play squash. “What you have in mind is absolutely crazy,” said a friend to whom he confided his secret wish. “But there’s a difference between crazy and stupid.”

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What is a Personal Philosophy, and How Do You Live in Alignment with Yours?

personal_philosophyAuthor: Dr. Michael Gervais
Source: Thrive Global

People talk about “becoming” and “being” your best.

What is someone’s “best?” Seriously, what is your “best?” It’s incredibly difficult to get your arms around it, partly because it’s a moving target that is influenced by dynamically moving components: your current skill, your world-view and the environmental conditions.

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Advice on Career, Life, and Travel from Amazing Women

marriottAuthor: Laura Begley Bloom
Source: Forbes

It’s a steamy morning at Mayakoba resort on the Riviera Maya of Mexico, and Suzanne Cohen, VP of Luxury Brands for the Americas at Marriott International, has just finished a presentation on brand strategy at the ILTM Americas conference — an annual gathering of luxury travel advisors and industry professionals. It’s a glamorous setting, for sure, but Cohen has only flown in for a series of meetings. Right before this, she was in Los Cabos doing a site inspection at the soon-to-open Solaz, a Luxury Collection Resort. Later that day, she’ll be off again to check out Marriott properties in other parts of the region.

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11 Useful Tricks to Improve Your Creative Thinking

Creative-Thinking-ListAuthor: Lorenzo Del Marmol
Source: Creative Corporate Culture

In this very competitive society we live in, the need for creative thinking is now more in demand more than ever. Both the corporate and organizational landscape require creativity from their staff and employees, may it be to come up with superbly packaged products, enticing marketing campaigns, innovation breakthroughs or as trivial as solving daily challenges in the workplace. Creative thinking is not for the artistic people alone. People who work in other fields need to fire up their creative thinking to get out of the rut called “creative block.”

Creative block is a phase when an individual seems not able to conjure a creative idea, or because he thinks not creative. That’s not true! Everybody can be creative but like everything you need to practice it. To work out your brain and to get out of this stagnation, applying a few but useful tricks should get your creative juices flowing.

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