An Introvert’s Guide to Interviewing

introvertAuthor: Yoona Wagener
Source: IdealistCareers

Interviewing can be a nerve-wracking experience, and if you’re an introvert, there may be an added level of complexity. It can be challenging to figure out how to do and say all the right things in an interview without presenting a forced, extroverted performance.

Here are a few tips to help you present yourself in a comfortable and honest way at your next interview. Hopefully, keeping these tips in your tool belt will make it easier to find a great fit for your work style.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Interview Question: Why Did You Leave Your Last Job?

new-jobAuthor: Alexis Perrotta
Source: Idealist Careers

No matter why you left your last job (or why you’re planning to leave your current job), the most important thing to remember when answering this question in an interview is, stay positive.

Below, you’ll find a few general categories that your response to this particular question may fall into, and based on that, further advice on how to answer in an honest, productive, and positive way.

You left your last job because of work-related issues

There are plenty of reasons why you may have left your last job. Perhaps you’re escaping a toxic workplace, you no longer feel connected to the mission of the organization, or you feel that you’ve plateaued professionally.

To answer this question in a positive way while also staying true to yourself, take the opportunity to highlight your professional needs (and how they went unmet at your previous job) without getting caught up in the specifics. Here is an example of what you could say:

“Communication is incredibly important to me and while I really enjoyed my last job, after [X YEARS], the quality of communication with my former supervisor was never quite what I wanted it to be.”

Once you have broached the subject, be prepared for a follow-up question; a good interviewer will go after some details. If you left your last job only after trying to address the issue that led to your ultimate resignation, highlight that in your follow-up. This is a great chance to show your interviewer that while you may have been dissatisfied, you didn’t throw in the towel too soon, nor were you complacent.

For example:

“The biggest pain point was communication between me and my supervisor. While I did try to address the issue by scheduling a formal meeting and suggesting a new weekly check-in format for us as well as inviting his feedback on how I can improve my own communication style, it didn’t improve. Ideally, I would like to have a mentor and a champion in my supervisor. I decided that for me, the issue was a dealbreaker.”

Pro Tip: Not only should you strive for honesty and authenticity in your interview because it’s the right thing to do, it’s also in your best interest. You should take every reasonable opportunity to truthfully represent what you’re looking for in a job, a team, and an organization.

You left your last job because of personal issues

If something came up in your personal life that made your last job untenable—schedule change, relocation, illness, or an ill relative—be honest. You don’t want to hide the truth until the 11th hour only to learn that whatever obstacle caused you to leave your last job—no remote work, inflexible hours, etc.—is also an issue at this new job.

In addition to honesty, it’s important that you make a connection to the organization. After all, if an interviewer asks, “Why do you want to work here?” you wouldn’t say, “To pay my bills.” Similarly, when an interviewer asks, “Why are you looking for a new job?” you don’t want to answer, “Because I hate my commute.” Instead, remember to speak to the specific job or organization. Here’s an example of what you could say:

“Later this year, I’ll be moving further from the city. While I really love the work and the mission, after [X YEARS] at my last job, I decided that I needed to find something that I love just as much, but that doesn’t require such a grueling commute. While it was bittersweet to leave, I’m also looking at my move as a great opportunity to connect with a new mission and reenergize my interest in, and commitment to the sector.”

In other words, you don’t want to say that you’re looking for a new job strictly for the sake of convenience. Don’t forget to let the interviewer know that you’re interested in this specific job.

READ MORE

How to Gauge a Company’s Culture in an Interview

Young People Work In Modern Office

Author: Emily Lamia
Source: Idealist Careers

Culture. It’s a big word. But what does it really mean?

We seem to know how to identify bad organizational culture: constant stress, unreasonable workloads, and passive aggressive or mean people. But aside from unlimited snacks, casual Fridays, and a summer picnic, what goes into determining how to define positive organizational culture?

The truth is, everyone’s version of a positive culture is different. This is why it’s important to have your own definition of what a good culture looks like to you in order to truly thrive in your social-impact career.

Continue reading

Your Complete Guide to the Interview Process

interviewSource: The Muse

Between the 20 or so of us, The Muse team has probably been on several hundred interviews in our day.

(We know. We cringe thinking about it, too.)

In other words, we’ve been through all of those OMG-what-should-I-wear panic attacks and bathroom-mirror rehearsals of the perfect answer to “What’s your biggest weakness?” that you’re probably dealing with as you prepare for your big day.

But all those pantsuits and practiced answers weren’t for naught. In the interest of sharing our hard-won job search expertise, we’ve put together a list of the biggest job interview questions we had going in—and answers that will help you go into yours totally prepared.

Consider it everything you ever wanted to know about interviewing—answered.

Continue reading

The Secret to Nailing an Interview is Not What Everyone Thinks It Is

job-interviewAuthors: Elena Botelho and Kim Powell
Source: The Ladders

Congratulations, you’ve made the short list of candidates for your dream job. Now all you have to do is pass the final test: How do I walk into the room and convince the decision makers that I’m their best choice?

This is the question on the mind of anyone, everywhere, who’s ever competed for a job. Unfortunately, it’s exactly the wrong question to ask. We know because we advise corporate boards, executives, and CEOs — from middle-market firms to the Fortune 500 — to help them make their most critical hiring decisions. We’re in those rooms all the time. More importantly, we’re in the heads of the people who make the decisions. Job seekers, here’s the surprising thing to understand before you walk into the room: They’re as anxious about the hiring process as you are. Maybe even more so.

Continue reading

4 Pre-Interview Poses to Boost Your Confidence

superman-posesAuthor: Farhan Raja
Source: Undercover Recruiter

Confidence, confidence, confidence!

It’s one of the most widely used words when it comes you job interviews and presentations. When you’re in its bubble, you’re ready to take on the world; your walk has swagger and your smile has charm, it’s a wonderful feeling! However, like any emotional state, it can change within an instant and having a lack of confidence can have a crippling effect on the rest of your mind and body.

If you don’t have confidence, you will likely struggle to express yourself clearly and your body language may give off negative and defensive vibes!

Continue reading

What To Wear To Your Job Interview (And What Not To)

Job-interview-dress-code

Author: Kristofer Pall Lentz
Source: Undercover Recruiter

How you dress for a job interview is something that requires a good deal of consideration but is all too often overlooked. It is important not to fall into the trap of putting too little focus on what to wear. In fact, in job interviews there is a higher expectation for people to wear appropriate clothing. Most likely, it will be your best shot at convincing the recruiter or hiring manager that you’re the right one for the position.

Continue reading