Why Staying Present in the Moment is So Important

presenceAuthor: Alyse Kalish
Source: The Muse

When I was in high school, my mom started banning phones from the dinner table. To this day, whenever I pull out my cell to check my inbox when we’re eating, my mom shakes her head and tells me to put it away.

And as much as I resent it in the moment (“But this, I swear, is really important!”), I’m usually grateful that she called me out.

As a working adult who’s being pulled in multiple directions at any given time, I rarely get to enjoy my time with friends and family. I’m sure you can relate. My mom, in fact, lives thousands of miles away, so when she forces me to pay attention to her it’s because we only have so much time together. And I listen to her, because I know I’ll regret not making the most of this time.

(If this isn’t the case for you and your parents, feel free to substitute “mom” with someone you enjoy being around.)

It’s so silly, but being present during our time with loved ones is one of the best gifts of self-care we can grant ourselves—and one that we tend to neglect the most often.

But don’t take it from me, I’m just your average working gal. Take it from someone who’s higher up—who has 10 times more responsibilities than I, and yet follows the same philosophy.

I spoke with Raji Arasu. In addition to being Intuit’s SVP of CTO Dev, she’s also an advisory board member for Code.org and the CTO Forum and serves on the board of directors at NIC Inc.:

One of the most important lessons I learned in my career was to drop the guilt and be present in the moment, whether it’s at work or at home. For that reason, I prioritize quality time with my family and colleagues. Being present in those delightful moments is what keeps me from reaching for my phone, and helps me to remain truly present. As a leader at Intuit, I try to set the example of making eye contact, actively listening, and participating in every interaction. I try to carry that appreciation for moments of true connection, whether at work or at home.

What I love most about Arasu’s advice is that she doesn’t just apply it to your time away from work. Practicing being present outside the office ultimately makes you better at it when you’re in the office. And this makes you a better employee (actively listening helps you better understand direction and take note of important social cues), and a more enjoyable co-worker to be around (actively paying attention makes people respect you and trust you to care for and support them).

And, like I said above, it’s good for you. It encourages you to truly unwind, take in and appreciate your breaks, and connect with people you love, all of which are crucial for anyone’s happiness. It’s almost as if it’s a form of mindfulness—crazy how that works!

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Overcoming Imposter Syndrome

impostersyndromeAuthor: Jessica Miller-Merrell
Source: Workology

You’re not who you say you are. People are going to find out you’re not as smart/talented/competent as you pretend to be. You’re faking it and you’re not making it.

Sound familiar? This is your brain on imposter syndrome. After I posted Women Working With Women: How to Work & Support One Another on this blog, I received so many calls and emails about imposter syndrome that I wanted to dedicate another post to just that.

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The One Piece of Advice I’d Give My Younger Self

careersteps_largeAuthor: Daniel B. Kline, Selena Maranjian, and Maurie Backman
Source: The Motley Fool

If young me knew what older me knows, I never would have tried to pull off white jeans or a pink knit tie. I also would have made some different career decisions.

Of course, it’s easy to look back and see what you did wrong (and sometimes friends post examples on social media). What’s harder is avoiding the mistake in the first place.

One way to do that is to examine what other people did on their way to career success. The three Motley Fool contributing writers below have all found their way to meaningful work they enjoy and they have gained a little wisdom they want to share.

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4 Steps to Following Your Dreams (Without Falling Flat on Your Face)

jump“When to Jump” author Mike Lewis says you should pay attention to your daydreams because they might just be nudging you toward a leap into your ideal job.

Author: Anne Fisher
Source: Monster

Two years out of an Ivy League college, 24-year-old Mike Lewis snagged a high-paying job with Bain Capital Ventures, a finance arm of prestigious consulting firm Bain & Co. He knew he should be happy. After all, only a tiny percentage of candidates for jobs like this are chosen, so getting hired at the firm, he says, was “like winning the lottery.”

Yet, an avid and skilled squash player, Lewis found himself spending more and more time “staring at the wall” in his office, daydreaming about quitting his job to play squash. “What you have in mind is absolutely crazy,” said a friend to whom he confided his secret wish. “But there’s a difference between crazy and stupid.”

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What is a Personal Philosophy, and How Do You Live in Alignment with Yours?

personal_philosophyAuthor: Dr. Michael Gervais
Source: Thrive Global

People talk about “becoming” and “being” your best.

What is someone’s “best?” Seriously, what is your “best?” It’s incredibly difficult to get your arms around it, partly because it’s a moving target that is influenced by dynamically moving components: your current skill, your world-view and the environmental conditions.

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Advice on Career, Life, and Travel from Amazing Women

marriottAuthor: Laura Begley Bloom
Source: Forbes

It’s a steamy morning at Mayakoba resort on the Riviera Maya of Mexico, and Suzanne Cohen, VP of Luxury Brands for the Americas at Marriott International, has just finished a presentation on brand strategy at the ILTM Americas conference — an annual gathering of luxury travel advisors and industry professionals. It’s a glamorous setting, for sure, but Cohen has only flown in for a series of meetings. Right before this, she was in Los Cabos doing a site inspection at the soon-to-open Solaz, a Luxury Collection Resort. Later that day, she’ll be off again to check out Marriott properties in other parts of the region.

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The Top 6 Actions that Promote Career Success

careersuccessAuthor: Cathy Caprino
Source: Forbes

In the past ten years of coaching and training professional women, entrepreneurs, and emerging leaders, I’ve had a window into the lives of women who are dreaming big and wanting more, and getting it.  Through this lens, I’ve observed several key actions and behaviors that continually pave the way for greater success and expansion.  I’ve also witnessed and experienced behaviors and beliefs that sabotage success, and guarantee failure.

No matter what your professional goals and visions are, there are six core actions that will support you to achieve greater success and fulfillment over the long arch of your professional life.  These actions will help you understand what you truly want to be in life, take the right action to build your desired professional identity, and get the support you need to sustain you through the tough times.

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