5 Creative Resume Hacks to Stand Out From the Crowd!

resumehacksAuthor: Abby Wolfe
Source: The Muse

We all know the feeling. The one when you tediously update your resume to ensure the recruiter knows that you (and only you!) are the perfect fit. But then you never hear anything. Not even crickets.

When your resume is the first thing the hiring manager sees, and she’s only looking at it for a few seconds, how do you make sure she picks yours out of the pile? Especially when some of those piles could have hundreds of applicants.

Well, today is your lucky day because I have a few simple changes you can make to give your resume a better chance to stand out.
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How to Translate Your Skills from One Industry to Another

resumeAuthor: Kat Boogaard
Source: The Muse

You’ve decided you want to make a career change, and you know that you’re going to need a polished resume to do so.

You sit down to make the updates, and it isn’t long before you feel stuck. The blinking cursor on that blank page has been taunting you for at least a half hour now. You have no idea how to translate your existing experience and skills in a way that will grab the attention of a hiring manager in this entirely new industry.

The job search is always a little intimidating, especially so when you’re aiming to make a switch. But rest assured, you absolutely can transfer your existing expertise and competencies to a brand new field—whether it feels that way or not.

Here’s what you need to know to prove you’re the perfect fit.

1. Identify Your Qualifications

The best place to start is reading the description for the position that you want and asking yourself: What boxes do I already check?

We’re assuming that you aren’t a former software developer applying for a role as a neurosurgeon or an airline pilot. So, even if this career change feels like a bit of a stretch, chances are good that you already possess at least a couple of straightforward qualifications that this role requires.

Pull out the requirements that you meet without a doubt—the ones where there’s no need for you to draw any parallels or offer any explanations for the hiring manager, because you satisfy those qualifications without any questions asked.

Maybe you have those 10 years of leadership experience under your belt. Or, maybe you’re a skilled public speaker as the job description requests. Put those things on your list.

This step is important, as it will arm you with the things that you want to draw the most attention to within your resume. Zoning in on those qualities that make you an obvious fit will help you present yourself as a seamless hire—even with your less traditional experience.

2. Emphasize Results

Employers everywhere—regardless of specific industry—appreciate an employee who’s able to get things done and produce results. That’s universal.

For that reason, it’s smart to highlight the results you achieved in your past positions—rather than simply listing the duties that you were responsible for. Particularly when you’re changing industries, prospective employers will care more about what you actually accomplished, and less about how you specifically did it.

Let’s look at an example for some added clarity. Kate previously worked in administration for a regional hospital, and is now aiming to make a change by applying for a sales position with a healthcare software company. She knows that her experience in the medical field will benefit her. But considering she’s never worked in sales before, she’s nervous about her perceived lack of qualifications.

Here’s a bullet point from Kate’s existing resume:

Responsible for planning, organizing, and executing the annual hospital black tie gala.

To emphasize results, Kate should quantify that point with some numbers while also tying it back to a larger, company-wide objective. In doing so, that bullet point could look like this:

Strengthened the hospital’s relationship with 500+ donors, board members, and other external stakeholders by coordinating and executing the annual black tie gala.

Not only is that second option far more impressive, it also touches on some qualities that would also be important in a sales career—including relationship-building and organization.

3. Connect the Dots

When applying for a role in a different industry, your duty as the job seeker is to make your previous experience appear as relevant as possible. Often, this means that you need to quite literally connect the dots for the hiring manager and bridge the gap between what you possess and what that position requires.

In some cases, this means cutting out things that won’t be applicable in your new industry—such as highly technical skills or specific pieces of software.

Then, challenge yourself to relate your existing experiences to this other field. Let’s look back again at Kate. Based on her research, she knows that meeting quotas are a key part of success in sales. While she didn’t need to meet specific sales goals in her previous role, she does have experience hitting fundraising goals. She could emphasize that in a bullet point like this one:

Consistently achieved the hospital’s yearly fundraising goal of $100,000 through successful relationship building, grant requests, and community events.

This statement proves a few important things about Kate that make her a fit for a sales role: She’s inspired by difficult-to-reach objectives, she recognizes the importance of relationships, and she’s comfortable making requests.

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Your Resume Only Has 5 Seconds To Make an Impression. Here’s What you Should Do.

resumeAuthor: Jack Kelly
Source: Forbes

I’d like to offer you some counterintuitive advice: don’t spend too much time worrying or stressing out over your résumé. Yes, I know everyone else tells you to spend an inordinate amount of time writing, rewriting, correcting, asking people to proofread it and offer their comments and advice to absolutely seek out a professional résumé writer. They’re all wrong and misleading you. I’ll make this part of your job search really easy.

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What You Should (Realistically) Do When You Make a Mistake On Your Job Application

mistakeAuthor: Alyse Kalish
Source: The Muse

You spelled the hiring manager’s name wrong on your cover letter. There’s a weird formatting issue on your interview assignment. You sent an older version of your resume that included blah, blah, blah under one of the titles.

Is all hope lost? Should you pack it in and give up, because you’re never landing that job?

Definitely not. In fact, there’s a simple way you can recover from your mistake and easily put yourself back in the running. Here’s how:

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Remove These Words and Phrases From Your Resume ASAP

resume

These terms may sound good to you, but they actually make recruiters cringe.

Author: Amanda Augustine
Source: Top Resume

Studies have found that the average recruiter scans a resume for less than 10 seconds before deciding if the candidate is a good fit for an open position. When you have so little time to impress a recruiter, every word on your resume counts. That’s why it’s important to carefully choose which terms belong on your resume and which are better left out.

Below are some tips to help you get your application noticed by including the right words on your resume and removing the ones that are proven to bore and repel recruiters.

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A Resume Template That Actually Lands You Interviews

doggyworkAuthor: Joanna Taborda
Source: The Muse

My first resume was just a half-page long and the only feedback I received was that I should’ve included more work experience. When I got home, I immediately did a Google search because I (admittedly) didn’t know what I was doing.

I went the other way for my next attempt and wrote my life story. It didn’t get me a single reply. I hated that feeling and decided to experiment until I found a resume that would give me results.

So, I started designing different templates. I tried various fonts, added images, and played with all sorts of colors and effects, until I created something I felt really proud of. As an arts major with design experience, I wanted to show off my particular skill set.

I sent out the revamped version, and the very same day I got a call for an interview. Fast-forward one month and I was working at a Ritz-Carlton resort. The first thing my manager said was “We don’t often get resumes like this in the hospitality industry, so I was eager to meet you.”

I’ve used this template with every application since. While I’m still relatively early in my career and I’ve shifted from hospitality to content editing, my resume has helped me get my foot in the door each time. I know that because I always get positive comments about it during interviews.

While I can’t guarantee that you’ll have the same results as me—this formatting might not be appropriate for every industry and role—I can share what I learned when I transformed mine from monotonous to eye-catching.

My First Resume

23151

My Current Resume

23152

1. I Settled on One Page

As I mentioned, after my too-short attempt, I overcompensated on the next round and described my life story. Seriously—I included the last play I acted in! While the latter might be pertinent when auditioning for a Broadway show, most times it’s better to leave off irrelevant information that drowns out all of your qualifications.

You should always tailor your resume to the position you’re applying for—and part of that means cutting extraneous information. It’s finding a balance between including relevant experience and removing things that distract from it.

For instance, if you want to be a content manager, you’d include any writing-related tasks you’ve had in your previous positions, plus include work on your personal blog. Doing so could mean getting rid of an earlier, unrelated position.

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14 Tips To Get Your Resume Read

reading-resume-ipadAuthor: Lewis Lustman
Source: Undercover Recruiter

You may know that when you submit your resume, it passes an automated Applicant Tracking System (ATS) scan. But that is just the opening skirmish in the battle; you’ve still got to persuade living, breathing hiring professionals that you are the best candidate for the job, and a coherent, polished resume can make recruiters and hiring managers sit up and take notice.

Take an objective look at your resume as it looks today. In fact, have a friend or professional acquaintance also review it and provide you with honest, unfiltered feedback. Is it geared to pass the review of a skilled recruiter or hiring professional who may spend as little as six seconds scanning it? With an abundance of resumes hitting their email boxes, HR pros can probably tell at a glance if your digital application materials are worthy of further consideration – or they’re better off just dragging your resume over to that little trash can icon.

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