A Cover Letter Written from the Perspective of a Dog!

doggoAuthor: Alyse Kalish
Source: The Muse

We talk about including personality in your cover letter all the time—and the benefits of doing so. It makes you stand out against hundreds of qualified candidates. It shows you’re a good fit for the company. It proves you’re more than just a list of accomplishments on a piece of paper.

But, to be honest, it’s tough to know what that looks like in action.

So when I came across the following cover letter by Sarah Levy—written from the perspective of her dog, Cooper—that led her to become the Communications Manager at The Farmer’s Dog, I knew I had to share it.

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The Best Career Advice from Top Professionals

ladderAuthor: Kate Antoniades
Source: Corporette

We recently contacted several top career coaches (many recommended by Corporette® readers!) to ask them to share their best career advice for professional women in BigLaw, BigFour, and other Big jobs. They shared their thoughts on growing your network and building your reputation, communicating with colleagues and making your expectations clear, keeping an open mind regarding your future career path, and deciding whether or not it’s time to leave a job. Readers, have you ever used a career coach? What’s your best career advice to share with young lawyers, accountants, or other professionals?

Psst: we’ve talked about how to find career coaches before, as well as offered other tips on how to succeed in your career.

Here’s what they shared with Corporette® readers as far as their best career advice:

 Elizabeth H. Munnell, J.D.EHMunnell: 

Some baseline advice for young women starting practice in large law firms: Do not listen to anyone who, in your first few years as a lawyer, warns against spending otherwise billable hours building your network and reputation in the community. Time spent developing a broad and coherent business network, and learning the basics of client development and business generation, is a direct investment in your future and a path to a self-sustaining practice. That it may be non-billable is irrelevant.

Your friends and classmates in the business community are already on message — and they are already ahead. MBAs receive sophisticated training in network building and business generation, and are not at all embarrassed, nor prohibitively intimidated, by the task. Keep in mind, also, that many of the men with whom you are competing start out with broader networks, and a better shot (yes — because they are men) of attracting the partner sponsors essential to advancement.

Rachael Bosch, Managing Director, Fringe Professional Development: 

My biggest piece of advice is to avoid the expectation void! Try your best not to make assumptions about other people and be as clear as possible with your own expectations. That may mean outlining your plans for a big vacation within your first year when you start or clearly outlining what behaviors you want to see from folks you manage. We live in a culture where the common reaction to tough conversations is “it’s just not worth it to say anything,” [and] my advice is that the price is too high to not clearly articulate your expectations. After all, if you set expectations that people don’t achieve, that’s on them. But, if you never set the expectation in the first place, that’s on you!

Kate Neville, President & Executive Coach, Neville Consulting Services: 

Before [leaving your employer], it can be worth the effort to think about how you might improve your daily experience within the organization. In conducting that cost-benefit analysis for any position, it’s important to:

1. Recognize that any job is going to have its pros and cons
2. Understand that the grass often looks greener from the other side
3. Prioritize what factors are most important to you
4. Make a distinction between what you can control and what you can’t
5. Identify which trade-offs you’re willing to accept, and
6. Develop strategies to effectively exert influence in areas that work to your advantage.

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Seven Bad Habits to Leave in Last Year

badhabitsAuthor: Gwen Moran
Source: Fast Company

January 1  is often a time when people set goals and make plans for the next 12 months. However, it’s just as important to your health and happiness–as well as the accomplishment of your resolutions and goals–to think about what you’re not going to do anymore.

“We all have a million habits. Half of them are probably not great habits, but it’s important to understand which habits are blocking you from your important goals,” says consultant Robert “Bob” O’Connor, author of Gumptionade: The Booster for Your Self-Improvement Plan.

As you’re making your list of what you want to do in the New Year, don’t forget to also think about what you don’t want to do anymore. Here are seven habits to consider ditching when the door closes on 2017.

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Profiling Success: Tyler Hosac

jobbshopcookies

The box of cookies we send to all our successfully placed candidates.

Here at The Job Shop we work hard to place you in a great job, and it is always wonderful when we have a success story to share. The Job Shop was started with a unique concept in mind – provide our clients and our candidates with the respect that they deserve. We offer guarantees on every placement that we make, to ensure satisfaction both for our candidates and our clients, and Walter is a great example of how that benefits everyone!

 

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5 Awkward Situations When You’re New at Work

awkwardAuthor: Abby Wolfe
Source: The Daily Muse

On day one of my first “real” job, I had no idea what to do with myself. Around 3:30 PM, I turned to a co-worker and asked, “So, uh, what time do you usually leave each day?”

When offered the job three weeks earlier, the hiring manager told me my hours were “up to me and my supervisor.” Well, that conversation never happened, so I had no idea when I could go home.

Starting a new gig can be really overwhelming—whether it’s your first one or your 10th. There are loads of unspoken rules you haven’t learned yet, and you have to get to know a whole new group of people.

But, as time goes on, there are certain situations that’ll become second nature. (Or at least feel a little bit easier.)

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Profiling Success: Walter Hernandez

jobbshopcookies

The box of cookies we send to all our successfully placed candidates.

Here at The Job Shop we work hard to place you in a great job, and it is always wonderful when we have a success story to share. The Job Shop was started with a unique concept in mind – provide our clients and our candidates with the respect that they deserve. We offer guarantees on every placement that we make, to ensure satisfaction both for our candidates and our clients, and Walter is a great example of how that benefits everyone!

 

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How to Recover From Your Boss Saying “No”

muse

Author: Richard Moy
Source: The Muse

It’s hard not to get excited when you wake up with an idea that you think your boss will love. Not only will it add one billion dollars to your company’s bottom line and make everyone’s wildest dreams come true, but you’ll probably go on to become a company legend.

But then you present your idea at a departmental meeting and your boss responds with a curt, “I don’t think it’s worth pursuing right now.”

And it’s crushing, right? I know from personal experience that hearing “no” from your boss can be really hard to bounce back from—whether you’re pitching an idea, asking for a raise, or proposing a change to your responsibilities.

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