5 Painful But Important Things To Do When You Lose Your Job

lostjobAuthor: Elizabeth Alterman
Source: The Muse

When I lost my job in 2014, I naturally slipped into a self-pity funk for a bit.

What did I do first? I promptly made an enormous bowl of tiramisu and attempted to soothe my bruised ego with dessert. But—as good as it feels to take a well-deserved time-out—the quicker you curtail the wallowing and get back to the grind, the better for your career.

After realizing I wasn’t going to find a new job at the bottom of my trifle bowl, I put my spoon in the sink and got right down to business. I found a new job six months later, but was again laid off in 2017 amid a restructuring. This time, I was much better prepared to re-enter the job market.

The following is a painful but crucial to-do list anyone who’s been laid off should follow, based on my experience:

1. Acknowledge Your Emotions, Then Move On

Immediately after you’ve been let go, you may find yourself experiencing a range of emotions: panic upon saying goodbye to a regular paycheck, exhilaration as you embrace life without a set routine, rage when you reflect on all the long hours you devoted to your former position—the list goes on.

Rather than get caught up in each of these, recognize that they’re all normal.

But then—and this is the tough love talk everyone needs in this situation—move on and focus on the future.

In the case of both my layoffs, multiple colleagues were let go at the same time. Proving the old adage “misery loves company,” we served as our own little support group, commiserating together, motivating each other, and sharing leads.

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If you find yourself alone and struggling, joining a group or talking to a professional can provide comfort and encouragement and help you reign in those negative emotions.

Related: How to Bounce Back After You Lose Your Job (and Feel Like the World’s Ending)

2. Tell Everyone (Yes, Even Strangers)

Chances are, your self-esteem has taken a hit, and saying “I’m unemployed” aloud makes it that much more real and devastating.

Though you may be tempted to keep your status a secret, friends and family can’t begin to help if they’re not aware. Letting people know you’re available for new opportunities is the first step in getting your job search off the ground. (This email template will make it easier).

Right after losing my job in 2014, I attended a friend’s party and upon meeting her pals, I was asked the dreaded, “So, what do you do?” I reluctantly told people about my layoff and waited to be flooded with boatloads of pity.

But what I got instead was actually solid support. From headhunter contact information to offers to share my resume with their HR departments, people I’d just met were more than willing to help. I left the party glad I’d spilled the beans, no matter how awkward I’d initially felt.

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Pro tip: When talking about it, focus on what you want to do next—rather than what happened. For example, “I recently lost my job at [Company] and what I’ve missed most is working with customers. So, in my next job, I’m looking for a customer-facing role at a mid-sized company” sounds a lot better than, “I was laid-off because my CEO doesn’t know how to budget and goodness knows how I’ll pay rent this month. Honestly, at this point, I’d take anything that doesn’t suck.”

Related: 4 Questions to Ask Your Network Besides, “Can You Get Me a Job?”

3. Get Your Finances in Check and Create a Budget

Talking money is awkward, but knowledge is power. Figure out exactly what you’ve got to work with so you’re not accumulating debt at a time when you can least afford it.

The difference between the paycheck you lost and what you receive from severance or unemployment will determine if you need to make some adjustments to your spending—and just how sizable those should be. And this budget worksheet can help you get organized.

When I was forced to stop and really look at my finances, I realized I had to make some changes. I started with a bunch of small cuts: dinners in, books borrowed from the library, yoga at home instead of at a nearby studio. Doing this not only made me feel like I was preventing a bad situation from getting worse, it also motivated me to find a new job—fast.

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What to Realistically Do if Nobody is Listening to You at Work

listentomeAuthor: Kat Boogaard
Source: The Muse

You’re in a team meeting, hashing out how to resolve an issue that everybody has been repeatedly battling with.

“What if we changed the process so that the sales team saw the report first?” you suggest, “That way the design team could step in with all of the information there—without having to re-format graphics later.”

Perhaps a few somewhat courteous colleagues mutter a “maybe” or a nonchalant “that could work,” but then the conversation quickly moves on to something different. You’re annoyed, but you decide to let it go for now.

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The Power of Yet: Keeping a Growth Mindset

booksAuthor: Stav Ziv
Source: The Muse

Carol Dweck preaches “the power of yet.”

If students don’t pass a test, it’s not because they’re inherently stupid, but because they don’t understand the material well enough—yet. If employees didn’t negotiate the best deal, it doesn’t mean all future deals are doomed. It means they haven’t honed their negotiating skills enough—yet.

Dweck, a psychology professor now at Stanford University, is known for decades of work on “mindsets,” or people’s beliefs about human qualities such as intelligence and talent, both their own and others’. She developed terms you might’ve heard before: the “fixed mindset” and “growth mindset.”

“My research has shown that the view you adopt for yourself profoundly affects the way you lead your life,” Dweck writes in Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, the 2006 book that pulls together years of psychology research for the general reader. “It can determine whether you become the person you want to be and whether you accomplish the things you value.”

Well, that sounds serious. Here’s what you need to know. Well, at least the basics. Continue reading

What is a Personal Philosophy, and How Do You Live in Alignment with Yours?

personal_philosophyAuthor: Dr. Michael Gervais
Source: Thrive Global

People talk about “becoming” and “being” your best.

What is someone’s “best?” Seriously, what is your “best?” It’s incredibly difficult to get your arms around it, partly because it’s a moving target that is influenced by dynamically moving components: your current skill, your world-view and the environmental conditions.

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What Can Your Former Employers Say About You?

talkingAuthor: Alison Doyle
Source: The Balance

One of the questions job seekers often ask is “What can an employer say about former employees?” Some job seekers believe companies can only legally release dates of employment, salary, and your job title. However, that’s not the case.

Can an employer say a former employee was fired or terminated for cause? How about saying that you quit without notice, were frequently tardy, or performed poorly on the job?

Are there limits to what an employer can say about you?

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Is Bending The Truth On Your Resume Ever OK?

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posted from TheUndercoverRecruiter.com

Bending the truth in your resume can be a double-edged sword. It may help you get the job you apply for, while getting caught bending the truth can come back to bite you years later. Depending on the truth you bend, you might cause legal issues for yourself, especially if you are bidding for a project as a contractor.

It’s sometimes a temptation to exaggerate your experience or give your job title a slight upgrade, but I suggest you think twice before “embellishing” your skills or experience, or you may find yourself looking over your shoulder for years to come.

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