5 Keys to Dealing With Workplace Conflict

conflictAuthor: Mike Myatt
Source: Forbes

Here’s the thing – leadership and conflict go hand-in-hand. Leadership is a full-contact sport, and if you cannot or will not address conflict in a healthy, productive fashion, you should not be in a leadership role. From my perspective, the issues surrounding conflict resolution can be best summed-up by adhering to the following ethos; ”Don’t fear conflict; embrace it – it’s your job.” While you can try and avoid conflict (bad idea), you cannot escape conflict. The fact of the matter is conflict in the workplace is unavoidable. It will find you whether you look for it (good idea – more later) or not. The ability to recognize conflict, understand the nature of conflict, and to be able to bring swift and just resolution to conflict will serve you well as a leader – the inability to do so may well be your downfall.

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5 Tips for Getting a Job After College Fast

now-whatAuthor: Meghan Ivarsson
Source: WorkAwesome

Getting a job after graduation is not very hard, but finding the one you really want will take some extra effort.

Of course you want a well-written resume, but there are several way ways you can ensure your success in landing a better job when you graduate.

Here are five tips, why you should try them and where you should start when you do.

1. Get involved with social media

LinkedIn is the place you should start if you want to enter the professional working world. The social media platform is nothing special, but it is well-known. It allows other members to see your profile, view your resume and check out credentials without having to “Friend” you.

Why? It is not actually about the magical effects of LinkedIn — it is about the people who use it. Corporate HR staff have to research into you as fully as possible via means other than your resume if they want to put you forward to be hired. LinkedIn is the biggest cheat that human resources can use since the invention of Google.

Starting point: Make sure every resume and email you send has a reference to your LinkedIn profile. Spend some time filling out your profile and make as many meaningful connections on there as possible.

2. Start blogging

Do not start a blog about your favorite Kardashian; start it about your chosen discipline. Show the world just how much you know. Post at least twice per month, but it needs to be a good one. You cannot afford to draft any old bunk. Your work needs to be high quality so that your potential employer can click on any one of them and see how great you are.

Why? It allows you to show the world that your qualifications actually mean something. It can be used to demonstrate your expertise and show that the information on your resume is correct. It may even pop up during the HR staff’s Google search, which will work heavily in your favor. HR staff love an Internet trail.

Starting point: You have files and files of school/college/university essays that are just sitting there. Edit them to make them perfect and publish them. If they’re long, break them into 500 word posts and publish them as a series.

3. Become an intern

An internship can be a good baby step into a future career. Some students want to have three or more internships prior to graduating.

Why? It does offer you a valuable bit of experience, but part of the reason is that it is an American tradition. Almost all career people have their intern stories. Unless you are entering a discipline such as the medical field, an internship is not needed, but it is still beneficial.

Starting point: Consult your guidance counselor and discuss your options. Check in with a favorite teacher who might have some ideas as well. Otherwise discuss it with an independent guidance company. They will put you on the right track for your chosen career, for the internships in your area and for your state.

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How to Deal with Depression at Work

deppressedAuthor: Betsy Aimee
Source: The Muse

A few months ago, I told you how a quarter-life crisis catapulted me into a severe depression, and my story of recovering. The response I received from that piece since tells me that I’m not alone in this plight, and that many of us have experienced a similar personal crisis. And a recent article on Forbes confirmed that more millennials are suffering from depression, anxiety, or some other form of mood disorder than ever before.

One of the hardest parts of my ordeal was that, in the midst of it all, I still had to be a functional adult and stay on top of my job responsibilities. And while there are many great books online about how to deal with depression or anxiety at work, I also want to share some suggestions based on my own experience for making it through—and even thriving.

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Hangry vs. Happy: How Food Affects Mood

lec-nutritionAuthor: Laura Clark
Source: Undercover Recruiter

The clock change is imminent, we can’t remember summer and the lure of the duvet feels stronger than ever, leaving us with no choice but to search ‘mood boosters’ on Google!

Mood is a tricky commodity. A low mood is influenced by so much; often fickle by nature it can come and go or creep up on us unexpectedly as we drag our heels and struggle to get through the day. Interestingly, all the EU nutrition and health claims submitted for approval around ‘mood boosting foods’ have not been authorised. Maybe this is because it is hard to quantify improved mood or single out a specific nutrient or compound capable of such a tall order.

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6 Job Search Tips So Basic People Forget Them

jobsearchAuthor: Jenny Foss
Source: The Muse

The irony of job search advice: There’s so much available that you don’t have to spend more than four seconds Googling about before you land on some nugget of wisdom or another.

Yet, at the same time, there’s so much available (some of which completely contradicts other advice you’ll find) that it can easily overwhelm you. Which, in fact, is probably the exact opposite outcome you’re looking for when you go sleuthing for genuinely useful counsel in the first place.

So let’s do this: Let’s boil things down to a short list of sound, timeless job searching tips that’ll help you fine-tune your strategy so that you may sail through the process (or at least cut out some of the unnecessary time and frustration).
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The Career Advice Women Want to Give to Women

career-woman

Author: Georgene Huang
Source: Forbes

One of the questions we’ve asked thousands of women in the Fairygodboss community is, “What career advice would you give another woman considering a job at your employer?” Everyone’s answers are different, but there are four recurring themes that can help you whether you’re conducting a job search or simply trying to figure out how to better navigate your career.

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5 Reasons You Don’t Have Work Friends, and What to do About Them

friends-workAuthor: Dorothy Tannehill-Moran
Source: CAREEREALISM

As humans, we need some form of social interactions (some of us more than others). However, we all do need and thrive on the simple act of connecting to people.

For the majority of us, our social fabric is created through work. We see these people every day. We have work in common. We get to know them in ways the spouse and significant others simply don’t. When we leave these people due to job change, it can be painful.

Yet, despite all this social goodness that work can bring, what happens when it doesn’t happen to you? What do you do when you don’t have friends at work? No one to save you space at a meeting or light up when you enter a room. It happens, and when it does, there’s no lonelier place to be. It can be so impactful that it can cause a person to look for another job.

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