What is a Personal Philosophy, and How Do You Live in Alignment with Yours?

personal_philosophyAuthor: Dr. Michael Gervais
Source: Thrive Global

People talk about “becoming” and “being” your best.

What is someone’s “best?” Seriously, what is your “best?” It’s incredibly difficult to get your arms around it, partly because it’s a moving target that is influenced by dynamically moving components: your current skill, your world-view and the environmental conditions.

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Advice on Career, Life, and Travel from Amazing Women

marriottAuthor: Laura Begley Bloom
Source: Forbes

It’s a steamy morning at Mayakoba resort on the Riviera Maya of Mexico, and Suzanne Cohen, VP of Luxury Brands for the Americas at Marriott International, has just finished a presentation on brand strategy at the ILTM Americas conference — an annual gathering of luxury travel advisors and industry professionals. It’s a glamorous setting, for sure, but Cohen has only flown in for a series of meetings. Right before this, she was in Los Cabos doing a site inspection at the soon-to-open Solaz, a Luxury Collection Resort. Later that day, she’ll be off again to check out Marriott properties in other parts of the region.

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How to Get Great Feedback in Your New Job

feedbackAuthor: Jessica Vann
Source: The Muse

The first 90 days of your new job are crucial to set yourself up for long-term career success. It’s where you make good on the promises you touted during your interview and set the stage for how people perceive you.

That’s why asking for feedback during this time is so, so important. It quickly demonstrates to your new boss that you’re invested, you’re committed to excellence, and that you’re in this for the long haul.

Plus, if done well, you can earn major brownie points that may help you get recognized later for opportunities to work on interesting projects or even advance more quickly.

Easy enough, right? Now that you know just how important your first 90 days are, here are some guidelines for how to ask for feedback to ensure you’re on the right path (or how to get on it).

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Remove These Words and Phrases From Your Resume ASAP

resume

These terms may sound good to you, but they actually make recruiters cringe.

Author: Amanda Augustine
Source: Top Resume

Studies have found that the average recruiter scans a resume for less than 10 seconds before deciding if the candidate is a good fit for an open position. When you have so little time to impress a recruiter, every word on your resume counts. That’s why it’s important to carefully choose which terms belong on your resume and which are better left out.

Below are some tips to help you get your application noticed by including the right words on your resume and removing the ones that are proven to bore and repel recruiters.

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What Can Your Former Employers Say About You?

talkingAuthor: Alison Doyle
Source: The Balance

One of the questions job seekers often ask is “What can an employer say about former employees?” Some job seekers believe companies can only legally release dates of employment, salary, and your job title. However, that’s not the case.

Can an employer say a former employee was fired or terminated for cause? How about saying that you quit without notice, were frequently tardy, or performed poorly on the job?

Are there limits to what an employer can say about you?

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How To Communicate at Work (Without Awkwardness)

communicationAuthor: Jennifer Magliano
Source: The Muse

We’ve all suffered through it. That moment you put your foot in your mouth big time and cringe inside. Hopefully it was among close friends, but what do you do if it wasn’t? Maybe it was in a meeting at work, or an offhand comment among co-workers, and you can’t stop kicking yourself for making such a professional blunder. Whatever the cringe-worthy situation, you know you need to prevent it from happening again. The solution? Clear communication.

A smooth interface with your boss and coworkers is key to a happy, successful work life. This is never more obvious than when communication breaks down—always, it seems, at the most crucial times. So, how can you keep communication flowing when the stakes are high?

It helps to be mindful of your own mode of communication, and others’ as well. The way you interact with coworkers with different communication styles can make all the difference. Read on and you’ll be communicating like a pro in no time.

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Quickly Improve Your Relationship with Your Boss

bossAuthor: Deb Pine
Source: The Muse

Worried what your boss thinks of you—if they like you, trust you, and think your contributions match up to their expectations?

If so, you’re not alone. Considering you’ll end up spending 10 years of your life at work, getting along with your boss is not only critical to succeeding in your career, but matters for your overall happiness and engagement at the office.

With that in mind, here are three easy ways to develop an effective, productive, and mutually rewarding relationship with your manager (even if they’re a tough cookie to crack):

1. Stop Using Email to Have Important Conversations

Is email your go-to forum for everything? In certain cases, it could be hurting your relationship. Even if it’s your manager’s favorite medium, it’s time to break the pattern of always relying on this.

Opt for in-person meetings if the conversation’s beyond a task or agenda-setting item—for example, if you’re asking for something or apologizing for a mistake. Not only is it just polite, it’ll most likely lead to a more productive discussion and help ensure you and your boss are truly on the same page.

“All of us are the worst possible version of ourselves in digital media,” adds Celeste Headlee, journalist and author of We Need to Talk: How to Have Conversations That Matter. “We might think we are persuasive in email, but scientifically, we are so much more persuasive in person.”

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2. See Your Relationship With Your Boss as a Two-Way Street

Too often, we see ourselves as the executors and our managers as the creators of work, forgetting that our manager is also responsible for their own assignments.

So, if you want to immediately improve your relationship, ask them this simple question: “What can I do for you?” By opening up this conversation, you open the door for them to delegate projects they may not have otherwise considered. And, taking on stretch assignments can improve your visibility and lead to career advancement.

Wondering what else you should be talking about with your manager? Read this: 8 Questions You Should Be Asking Your Boss.

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